BCMA Proteins, Antibodies, cDNA Clones Research Reagents

TNFRSF17 (TNF Receptor Superfamily Member 17) is a protein coding gene located on human chromosome 16p13.13. TNFRSF17 is also known as BCM, BCMA, CD269 and TNFRSF13A. The human TNFRSF17 gene encodes a 20165 Da protein containing 184 amino acids. The TNFRSF17 protein is biasedly expressed in lymph node, duodenum and other tissues. Among its related pathways are TRAF Pathway and TNF Superfamily - Human Ligand-Receptor Interactions and their Associated Functions. TNFRSF13C is an important paralog of TNFRSF17 gene. TNFRSF17 is associated with some diseases, including Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor and Macroglobulinemia.

BCMA Protein (17)

    BCMA Antibody (5)

      BCMA cDNA Clone (40)

      NM_001192.2
      NM_001105761.1
      XM_001106892.2

      BCMA Lysate (10)

        BCMA Background

        Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 17 (TNFRSF17), also known as B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) or CD269 antigen, is a member of the TNF-receptor superfamily. This receptor is preferentially expressed in mature B lymphocytes, and may be important for B cell development and autoimmune response. This receptor has been shown to specifically bind to the tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 13b (TNFSF13BBAFF), and to lead to NF-kappaB and MAPK8/JNK activation. TNFRSF17/BCMA/CD269 also binds to various TRAF family members, and thus may transduce signals for cell survival and proliferation. TNFRSF17/BCMA/CD269 is a receptor for TALL-1 and BCMA activates NF-kappaB through a TRAF5-, TRAF6-, NIK-, and IKK-dependent pathway. The identification of TNFRSF17 as a NF-kappaB-activating receptor for TALL-1 suggests molecular targets for drug development against certain immunodeficient or autoimmune diseases. TNFRSF17/BCMA is a target of donor B-cell immunity in patients with myeloma who respond to DLI. Antibody responses to cell-surface BCMA may contribute directly to tumor rejection in vivo.

        BCMA References

        • Novak AJ, et al. (2004) Expression of BCMA, TACI, and BAFF-R in multiple myeloma: a mechanism for growth and survival. Blood. 103 (2): 689–94.
        • O'Connor BP, et al. (2004) BCMA is essential for the survival of long-lived bone marrow plasma cells. J Exp Med. 199(1): 91-8.
        • Moser K, et al. (2006) Stromal niches, plasma cell differentiation and survival. Curr Opin Immunol. 18(3): 265-70.

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